Tag Archives: anti-war

The eight signs of terrorism

My friends at Generation Cobweb are running a series on the destruction of America. Here at the Freedom Exchange we certainly agree our rights are being eroded. When I came across this little tidbit I was both amused and frightened. Without further ado I give you the eight signs of terrorism (according to our government) and my comments.
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Terrorist operations usually begin with extensive planning. You can help prevent and detect terrorism — and other types of crime — by watching out for suspicious activities and reporting them to the proper authorities. Be alert for the eight signs of terrorism!

1. Surveillance- Someone recording or monitoring activities. This may include the use of cameras, note taking, drawing diagrams, annotating on maps, or using binoculars or other vision-enhancing devices.
So the next time you go on vacation don’t look too long at any national monument and for God’s sake leave your camera at home.

King George’s War

There was never a justification for invading Iraq. No wmd’s, Saddam Hussein had no part in 911, Al Queda was not using Iraq as a staging ground for attacks against the US or our allies. George Bush decided to go to war and that was that.

After five years and hundreds of thousands dead the war still goes on. It needs to stop. Now.

They held the coronation
Up in Washington
Gallant balls and celebration
If you’re connected, son
I tried to tell myself
It’s only four more years
But it’s the changes in between
That are feeding my fears

King George’s War
Watch your rights just slippin’ away
King George’s War? ?
On the streets of Baghdad
Or right here in the USA

Another mother’s son
Supports the country he loves
Random fire cuts him down
When will it finally be enough
A mother’s cry in any toungue
Still sounds the same
Her child dies in any land
She feels the same pain

King George’s War
Watch your hopes just slippin’ away
King George’s War
On the streets of Baghdad
Or right here in the USA

800 gather to mourn peace activist Oda

A memorial service was held Saturday for award-winning writer and peace activist Makoto Oda, who died of stomach cancer on July 30 at age 75.

Nobel Prize-winning novelist Kenzaburo Oe, novelist and playwright Hisashi Inoue, critic Shuichi Kato, and Takako Doi, a former leader of the Social Democratic Party, were among 800 people who gathered at the Aoyama Sogisho funeral hall in Tokyo’s Minato Ward.

Later, about 500 mourners marched to a nearby subway station carrying banners declaring, “We will take on your wishes for anti-war movements” and singing “We Shall Overcome,” a protest song popular in the 1960s.

At the memorial service, philosopher Shunsuke Tsurumi compared Oda’s influence on events to that of John Manjiro, who served as an important bridge between Japan and the United States as Japan opened its doors to the world toward the end of the Edo Period (1603-1867).

Oda formed the Beheiren, an anti-war citizens group, in 1965 with other activists, including Tsurumi, to protest the Vietnam War.